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Your interactive Journey to Parenthood provides you with an opportunity to create a journal detailing what matters to you, during your pregnancy, labour and after birth.

The journal will give your maternity team the opportunity to get to know you better and understand your feelings and priorities. This is a chance for you and your partner to consider what is important to you, share this with professionals and personalise your care.

Download the journal for free here. 


When you find out you’re pregnant, you may feel happy and excited, or shocked, confused and upset. Everybody is different, and don’t worry if you’re not feeling as happy as you expected. Even if you’ve been trying to get pregnant, your feelings may take you by surprise.

Some of this may be caused by changes in your hormone levels, which can make you feel more emotional. Even if you feel anxious and uncertain now, your feelings may change. Talk to your midwife or GP – they will help you to adjust, or give you advice if you don’t want to continue with your pregnancy.

Men may also have mixed feelings when they find out their partner is pregnant. They may find it hard to talk about these feelings because they don’t want to upset her. Both partners should encourage each other to talk about their feelings and any worries or concerns they may have. Take a look at the ‘you and your partner’ section of this website for more information and advice.


There is lots to think about during the mid to late stages of your pregnancy.

Follow the development of your baby via the NHS week by week guide.


It is important for you to know the signs of labour and to be prepared. Knowing all about the stages of labour and what to expect will also help put your mind at rest. Find out more via the Labour and Birth page.

As you get closer to your due date, there are lots of things to think about in preparation. We take you through some of these below:



Pregnancy normally lasts about 40 weeks – that’s around 280 days from the first day of your last period. Most women go into labour a week either side of this date, but some women go overdue. Read about the choices available to you should you go overdue. (PDF leaflet)